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Topic: Environmentally Adverse Reels, Need to consider other materials< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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hotrod Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 19 2008,19:15  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

One of the most energy intensive materials we use is aluminium. Normally aluminium works have a dedicated hydo-electric plant to provide the energy to produce refined aluminium.
Then, when we have the solid aluminium billet we machine away about 90% of the material, using a lot of energy to undertake the machining process. The waste material is reused but it has to be melted, hence using more energy, before it can be recycled.
As fly fishers, we claim to be environmentally friendly. Can we really justify such energy thirsty processes to make our gear?
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andy_with_a_rod Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 19 2008,19:18 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

erm, i guess if it lasts a lifetime then yeah, i think we can.

can we justify owning probably at least 10 different computers in a lifetime, or driving 10 different cars? maybe if they were made to the same standard as an aircraft grade aluminium reel and lasted longer we would be more environmentally friendly.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 19 2008,20:04 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Good point.  

We were looking at my Galvan Torque 12 this weekend and wondering if the scrap was recycled.  I may try to find out.

I'm guessing that cast aluminum reels waste alot less material.


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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 19 2008,20:09 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

"cue some company releasing the first reel made from recycled materials..."

ab


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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 19 2008,20:19 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You are forgetting one point. Making aluminum is probably the best option for storing hydroelectric power there is. If you don't do something with it at the time, it is just water over the dam.
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 19 2008,21:32 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I guarantee you the AL is being recycled. Even if the mfg isn't overly concerned with it, the shop guys are collecting it for their beer fund  :D

Some percentage of the stock is probably already recycled. Many of the material certs allow for an amount of recycled material. I've only seen a couple requirements for 100% virgin ingot, and those were only put up by the customer despite the fact that material analysis checks are needed to attain certs.

You can rough cut through AL at a pretty good clip. Machine time there is much less than the high tolerance surfaces.

Castings can be sketchy for quality and usually have some heavy tooling costs. Gas inclusions and grain structure can be tough to control on short runs and require heat treatment and additional inspection. Standard stock is just much more available and reliable plus far less headache for small manufacturers.

While is sounds from most manufacturers that they're using bar stock, where it's cost effective they could be using extrusions (maybe an H shape) though it usually takes a pretty good sized lot to make it worthwhile.


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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 19 2008,23:13 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi,

Is aluminium as easy to recycle as steel/iron? I know it takes vastly less energy to recycle steel than it does to create it from scratch. 70% less or something?

We have an aluminium smelter here in NZ. It uses some ridiculous proportion of the nation's electricity. It was built here because of the availability of cheap hydro power. I believe all the bauxite is shipped from Australia and that most of the aluminium is shipped straight back overseas in ingot form. If it was providing all NZ's aluminium needs I might be more sympathetic, but instead I can't help feeling that shutting it down would free up extra electricity capacity for NZ and help to avoid some of the hydro damming schemes or land-based wind farms that are being proposed right now. Even if it were only a temporary solution that got us 10 years, in that time I would hope that there will have been a lot of progress in energy efficiency and generation that might help to avoid damming some of our last relatively unspoilt big rivers, or messing up other rivers further ( thinking of the Arnold there ).

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 19 2008,23:43 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi,

I would also like to suggest that all energy use is not bad. To my mind it's wasting energy through inefficient processes which is the problem, or if the processes have a deleterious environmental effect.

As an ex-composite boatbuilder who's health was seriously impacted in part from the chemicals used in the composite boatbuilding industry, and who also knows a lot of other boatbuilders who are in worse health than they should be, I think we should also spare a thought for, as an example, the ladies at the factory who build many of our rods. They're mainly using pre-preg I think, so there isn't quite the same exposure level as we had, but they are still using the same sorts of things. That's not to mention the nasty dust from grinding carbon fibre etc.

Nothing about modern fly fishing tackle is exactly clean and green. From an environmental perspective we'd be much better off going back to split cane rods, silk or horse hair lines and wooden reels, all of which are renewable resources. Not to put a dampener on the discussion, but IMHO it's not worth wringing our hands over the environmental impact of our fishing equipment unless we're prepared to step back to before WW2 technologically ( not to discount the advances made by modern split cane builders of course :-). I don't know about you, but I'm not :-). I would however certainly be encouraging manufacturers to make the best efforts to make gear using environmentally sound methods, with as little resource wastage and pollution as possible.

I really don't think that the desire to use energy efficiently and to avoid serious environmental impacts means we need to go back to the dark ages.

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Jo
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 20 2008,00:45 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Should we stop drinking beer too? Am sure most fishermen will use more aluminium in beer cans than in any reels they have.
Much more important issues to dedicate our energy too than this, in my opinion.
Dan
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 20 2008,00:53 Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi Dan,

In the US I'm pretty they still use steel for their cans, so it isn't such a pressing issue ;-).

Regards,

Jo
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