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Wading boots by shoe companies

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sms
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Re: Wading boots by shoe companies

#11

Post by sms » Fri Jul 31, 2020 1:03 pm

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Lasse Karlsson
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Re: Wading boots by shoe companies

#12

Post by Lasse Karlsson » Fri Jul 31, 2020 2:40 pm

Those are definetly interesting, like the studs too!

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Re: Wading boots by shoe companies

#13

Post by Geenomad » Sat Aug 01, 2020 5:21 am

Thomas wrote:
Thu Jul 30, 2020 7:21 am
Different strokes for different folks. :) I hate wading boots with a lot of ankle-support and stiff soles.
I agree Thomas. Here in Oz, last time I bothered looking, there were hikers of the old school with heavy stiff boots and new school hikers wearing runners, literally or effectively. Not interested in arguing about it but I regard most of the brand wading boots I've tried as both uncomfortable to walk long distances in and unsafe to wade in over slippery river rocks. There are good anatomical and evolutionary reasons for having ankles that move relatively freely compared with knee and hip joints. Imagine having ankles that were hinge joints like knees and what would happen to your balance and ability to stay upright.

When I step onto a river rock I want the sole to deform to the shape of the rock as much as is reasonably possible. (At least one of the things felt does is to enlarge the contact area.) I don't like wading with planks on both feet. My current solution are lace up work boots. One pair has studs and one doesn't and I still have enough money left over to buy several more pairs before I reach the cost of one pair of brand wading boots (clodhoppers).

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Mark
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Re: Wading boots by shoe companies

#14

Post by Thomas » Sat Aug 01, 2020 6:47 am

HI Mark,

I agree completely with what you have to say. The only thing I dont like about a trailrunning-shoe as a wadingboot is that it is low and hence that the gravelguards does not work. There are, however, trailrunning-shoes made for running in the winter that are a bit higher. For example, look at these:

https://www.addnature.com/salomon-snowc ... 26644.html

I will buy something like these when my current pair gives up.

/Thomas

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Paul Arden
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Re: Wading boots by shoe companies

#15

Post by Paul Arden » Sat Aug 01, 2020 6:56 am

I haven’t tried them yet but the Orang Asli use a knobbly soft rubber boot from Thailand. It’s hard to believe what they put these shoes through. I’ll get a pair and try them out. However one of the things I don’t like about them is that they don’t keep out the leeches. The OA are quite used to leeches having been “leeched” many millions of times in their lives (I notice that they chop them up like onions with their machetes). I’m still not used to them and so try to protect myself from these bastards.

When I attempted the NZ Coast to Coast (must go back and nail that some time, but learn to kayak skinny kayaks first!) many runners had their ankles bandaged tight to their feet for the hill run. I didn’t - and didn’t like the idea of this for the same reasons as you. But I found it interesting.

I don’t think that the perfect boot exists. It’s always a compromise. I spent one summer wading NZ in diving booties. :laugh:

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Re: Wading boots by shoe companies

#16

Post by Thomas » Sat Aug 01, 2020 7:10 am

Hi Paul,

I know some runners who do the same. The thing that they all have in common is weak ankles. I train my ankles for strenght and have never felt the need for any kind of ankle-support.

/Thomas

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Re: Wading boots by shoe companies

#17

Post by Thomas » Sat Aug 01, 2020 7:14 am

Paul,

Do you have a link to the boots the Orang Asli use? I would be interesting to see what they look like.

/Thomas

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Paul Arden
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Re: Wading boots by shoe companies

#18

Post by Paul Arden » Sat Aug 01, 2020 7:40 am

Nope and I can’t find them online. I’ll take a closer look on Monday when I see them again. They must be available here locally in Malaysia.
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Re: Wading boots by shoe companies

#19

Post by Paul Arden » Sat Aug 01, 2020 7:47 am

This was definitely one pair I saw a couple of guys wearing.
81BC0832-E745-4090-8CB5-DE2C03414C7E.jpeg
8RM. That’s around 2USD.
https://shopee.com.my/Adidas-Kampung-An ... 2774880519

But I have to try them.

Cheers, Paul

Edit there is no stitching by the way. That’s just rubber mould. The laces are real however :D
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Re: Wading boots by shoe companies

#20

Post by Geenomad » Sun Aug 02, 2020 3:48 am

Thomas wrote:
Sat Aug 01, 2020 6:47 am

The only thing I dont like about a trailrunning-shoe as a wadingboot is that it is low and hence that the gravelguards does not work. There are, however, trailrunning-shoes made for running in the winter that are a bit higher.
Hi Thomas
Yes we are on the same page. It's a long story I won't bore people with but after trying some "amphibious" boots I discovered their weaknesses and moved on to the work books (Dunlop Dakota). For river wading the running shoe/boot offered little protection from rock edges and crevices. For walking they were very comfortable but susceptible to stick damage - like when your leading foot stands on a stick, lifting it up a touch, and the trailing foot then collides with sharp bits. Happens more often when I'm looking for fish. :D

Until Covid came along I made an annual 6 week trip to Tassie - all kinds of terrain and substrates. Back of an envelop guesstimate was that I averaged about 10kms each day for 40 days. Quite a test for any footwear and enough to find all the strengths and weaknesses - even odd spots. For example I waded a couple of tarns with very soft and sticky bottoms. The work boots weren't made with that sort of activity in mind - the stresses applied by lifting against significant resistance. Result was that the lace section, where secured to the upper by a single row of stitches, began to separate. Solution was reinforcement with nylon webbing and a surprisingly strong adhesive/sealant that remains flexible. Yet to be fully tested.

As Paul said there are no perfect boots. At least there are no boots that remain perfect as the range and intensity of usage expands. Different people have different footwear needs and preferences. I can only speak to mine, of course. :)

Cheers
Mark
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