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Bikes

Moderator: Haggisboy

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Haggisboy
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Bikes

#1

Post by Haggisboy » Mon Jul 01, 2013 10:15 am

I know there are some serious bike peeps here so got a couple questions...

I am thinking of getting a MTB for commuting to work (along dirt paths), not got a huge budget, maybe up to £600 tops, anything I should be looking for/avoiding, any recommendations would be appreciated.

Many thanks,

Campbell

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JanMan
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#2

Post by JanMan » Mon Jul 01, 2013 1:53 pm

Hi Campbell,

Definitely get a hardtail rather than a full suspension bike. Unless you are very short I would also strongly recommend getting a bike with 29'' wheels rather than 26'' - rolls and keeps momentum much better.

A couple of links that may be useful. You may also want to check out some of the German brands that are available online, that are very good value for money. Such as Cube, Canyon and Focus.

http://www.bikeradar.com/mtb/gear/artic ... 500-29451/

http://www.bikeradar.com/mtb/gear/artic ... 000-29222/

Cheers,
Jan

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skeg
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#3

Post by skeg » Mon Jul 01, 2013 2:10 pm

I use this for town...you can change the tyres of course.
Focus Planet Tr6

http://instagram.com/p/Z3RteGOQXa/

here's their site http://www.focus-bikes.com/int/en/bikes ... urban.html

...Cube has nice and light cross bikes, too.
Hyde Race, and so...
http://www.cube.eu/en/tour/

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Haggisboy
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#4

Post by Haggisboy » Mon Jul 01, 2013 2:30 pm

Thanks guys, the cube bikes are defo on my radar and I have been told that the 29ers are the way to go as there will be a lot of flat on my commute. I can get a deal through work which saves about 33% on the cost.

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Paul Arden
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#5

Post by Paul Arden » Mon Jul 01, 2013 6:36 pm

I'm also going to buy a mountain bike, but at the end of summer. It will only be used off-road, for bombing around forest tracks and hills - there's a lot of national park here. It will be muddy as hell in the autumn. The idea is to keep me on a bike when the roads are wet. Still not a full suspension?

Thanks, Paul
It's an exploration; bring a flyrod.

Flycasting Definitions

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JanMan
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#6

Post by JanMan » Mon Jul 01, 2013 7:56 pm

Hey Paul,

I recently upgraded from a hardtail to a fully - and I absolutely love it. Much more comfortable and easier on my back, especially on longer rides and it allows me to keep pedalling/momentum on certain sections where I'd normally stand up to absorb bumps. However, full sus also means heavier and a little less responsive - which is why some people swear by hardtails for cross-country mtb'ing. Even more important is the geometry and suspension system. Cheap fullies will tend to "bob" when you pedal, rather than converting your energy into forward momentum, whereas the better ones are designed in a way so that only impacts from the ground/tire will affect the suspension. In other words, unless you're willing to pay for a good quality bike, it may be better to spend your money on a decent hardtail and some good mud tires. Also really depends on the terrain that you'll ride. If we're talking "all mountain" with drops, jumps and very rocky trails, then a hardtail will limit you.

Cheers,
J.

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Paul Arden
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#7

Post by Paul Arden » Mon Jul 01, 2013 8:42 pm

Thanks Jan!
It's an exploration; bring a flyrod.

Flycasting Definitions

Svend
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#8

Post by Svend » Mon Jul 01, 2013 9:34 pm

Campbell, do yourself a favor and take a good hard look at the 700c (700c=road bike=29'') flatbar cross hybrids. They're quick on pavement and once you lower the tyre pressure they're wicked fast off-road too. Think cyclocross with front suspension but without the drop bars and racy geometry.
More importantly, in the price range you're looking at every extra £ you spend will give you more durable components! £600 is well below the point of diminishing returns in terms of component quality.


Cheers, Svend

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Haggisboy
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#9

Post by Haggisboy » Tue Jul 02, 2013 9:59 am

Hi Svend,

Any recommendations on these bikes, the hybrid bikes look interesting enough. I can see how easy it would be to spend a fortune on a bike, but I need to draw the line somewhere. :cool:

My concern is I spend a fortune and eventually realise I cannot be arsed cycling to work everyday because our weather is mostly shit and the bike just sits, the alternatively, I think well, I used to cycle a lot when I was Young and liked it, and what if I like cycling again now I am old-er and realise the bike I bought is not up to scratch. I guess its the same with any gear you buy.

Its funny how the money I am budgeting for a bike is the same as a top end fly rod and that seems "normal".

C

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Marc Fauvet
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#10

Post by Marc Fauvet » Tue Jul 02, 2013 10:29 am

hiya Campbell,
just a thought, if it's for commuting and since it rains a lot there, and because there's always stuff to carry, think about getting a frame that easily accepts mud guards and maybe a rack. (front rack is better than at the back)
the purists think mudguards are dorky but they also have to deal with a muddy and wet crotch, legs, back, everything... :kungfu:
riding a bike in wet conditions means getting just as much wet from below that above.

when i was a messenger i had made a quick adapter to put on the mudguards in a minute or so because there weren't any snap-ons then. i was a hell of a lot less grumpy at the end of the day :)

cheers,
marc

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