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Wet bike maintenance

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Paul Arden
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Wet bike maintenance

#11

Post by Paul Arden » Tue Jul 09, 2013 4:06 am

Yes but how much difference? 15 mins? Can I sit at 32K for the same effort to sit at 30?

I guess at some point it's going to become important. I hope so!

Cheers, Paul
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Svend
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Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2013 12:06 pm
Location: Denmark mostly

Wet bike maintenance

#12

Post by Svend » Tue Jul 09, 2013 7:33 am

Paul Arden wrote:My question is how much difference would a really good bike make?
That's like asking how much difference would a really good fly rod make. Probably none at all but if you pick a rod geared towards a specific kind of fishing, the difference is going to be significant.
If i were you i'd work with a professional bike fitter who is used to fitting triathletes. A proper bike fit not only improves your ride, it will benefit your running too.

Cheers, Svend

Viking Lars
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Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2013 10:45 am

Wet bike maintenance

#13

Post by Viking Lars » Tue Jul 09, 2013 7:46 am

A good bike does make a difference, no question about it, but the real difference comes from a proper bike fit. A friend who's also a triathlete cut app. 10% off his bike time after he got a new bike - a combination of a perfect fit and a better bike. And even if that doesn't happen, you'll use less energy with a proper fit!

A better bike makes better use of the watts you put into the pedals, and often a new bike is easier to fit to you, and will often provide a better fit too.

On the question of maintenance after a rainy ride - really all you need, providing the bike is relatively clean, is to lubricate the chain and maybe a few other exposed parts if needed. Bearings and everything should be just fine unless they're worn out in which case lubricating is like pissing your undies to stay warm in a snowstorm :-).

One really good trick to prolonging life on your bike is to get a new chain 2-3 times a year if you ride many k's. The chain wears out the cogs as the chain is worn (it gets longer), and changing your chain one or twice a year gets so mamny more k's out of the rest of the bike.

Lars

Svend
Posts: 146
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2013 12:06 pm
Location: Denmark mostly

Wet bike maintenance

#14

Post by Svend » Tue Jul 09, 2013 7:54 pm

Viking Lars wrote:One really good trick to prolonging life on your bike is to get a new chain 2-3 times a year if you ride many k's.
I'm not so sure if a rule of thumb like this is very helpful. As an example i go through more than 10 chains a year. Chain wear is individual and depends on a number of factors. If the goal is to extend the lifespan of both cassette and chainrings or just to maintain optimum shifting performance overall, measuring chain wear is a good approach.


Cheers, Svend

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