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Waypoints

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Bianchetti Ivan
Posts: 170
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2015 8:25 am

Re: Waypoints

#11

Post by Bianchetti Ivan » Sat Oct 24, 2020 4:26 am

Paul Arden wrote:
Fri Oct 23, 2020 8:28 am
Not perfect Dirk. Had to deal with a front coming through so had to put myself between the camera and the loop. These are aerielised “anchors” which is immediately what came to mind when I read your first post today.

[media] [/media]

Cheers, Paul
I use this thing from time to time to change direction, but for a normal cast it does not work, it is dangerous and also not very efficient, if we compare it to what you could do without using it, if you want to have a good cast, the fly or line must still lay back, thus eliminating the utility, I would be happy to be proved wrong by your skills 😁

Dirk le Roux
Posts: 477
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 5:09 pm
Location: Pretoria, South Africa

Re: Waypoints

#12

Post by Dirk le Roux » Sat Oct 24, 2020 5:45 am

Hi Graeme

That's indeed a handy thing, mate! Great casters often exhibit that subtle rod adjustment around the stroke change-over. Once awake to it, you notice it a lot. It cleans/tightens the casts more or less following the "180 rule" very nicely. To me in this scenario, "waypoint" thoughts feature more as a good-to-know than a conscious focus on waypoint deployment. Now, this latter mode I have found pure gold to understand and direct what I am doing on the more drastic direction change casts. Paul may find the waypoint focus helps his air anchors game, too.

Cheers,
Dirk

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Paul Arden
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Re: Waypoints

#13

Post by Paul Arden » Sat Oct 24, 2020 5:48 am

Hi Ivan,

Depends what you are comparing here. If we are to land the anchor on the water and then compare snaplift switch to switch without the snaplift, then the snaplift goes further. This is because of the way the anchor folds over and lands. We are talking several metres difference with trout tackle and long belly or DT lines.

I have no problems fishing these (and other similar) casts with dry flies. It’s only dangerous if you don’t control them properly (lack of practise!). I will do a teaching video of them at some point.

If we are comparing anchored to aerielised then I agree the anchored is more efficient. However the aerielised is less disturbing. I often aerielise all Spey casts, including Double and Single Spey and Snake Roll. Some distance is sacrificed but an aerielised Double Spey is far less disturbing and has no splash.

Cheers, Paul
It's an exploration; bring a flyrod.

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Dirk le Roux
Posts: 477
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 5:09 pm
Location: Pretoria, South Africa

Re: Waypoints

#14

Post by Dirk le Roux » Sat Oct 24, 2020 6:04 am

Bianchetti Ivan wrote:
Sat Oct 24, 2020 4:26 am
I use this thing from time to time to change direction, but for a normal cast it does not work, it is dangerous and also not very efficient, if we compare it to what you could do without using it, if you want to have a good cast, the fly or line must still lay back, thus eliminating the utility, I would be happy to be proved wrong by your skills 😁
Hi Ivan

For efficiency, the straight cast you get by the fly or line laying back is king, no doubt. Sometimes you need because of conditions though to make a Belgian cast, Steeple cast, Break 180, change direction mid-cast, Snaplift Switch, Spey and Roll. With this kind of cast, incorporating waypoint thinking has helped me very much. It can even help your straight casting (extended drift, layback, Graeme's adjustments).

Cheers,
Dirk

Bianchetti Ivan
Posts: 170
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2015 8:25 am

Re: Waypoints

#15

Post by Bianchetti Ivan » Sat Oct 24, 2020 6:12 am

Dirk le Roux wrote:
Sat Oct 24, 2020 6:04 am
Bianchetti Ivan wrote:
Sat Oct 24, 2020 4:26 am
I use this thing from time to time to change direction, but for a normal cast it does not work, it is dangerous and also not very efficient, if we compare it to what you could do without using it, if you want to have a good cast, the fly or line must still lay back, thus eliminating the utility, I would be happy to be proved wrong by your skills 😁
Hi Ivan

For efficiency, the straight cast you get by the fly or line laying back is king, no doubt. Sometimes you need because of conditions though to make a Belgian cast, Steeple cast, Break 180, change direction mid-cast, Snaplift Switch, Spey and Roll. With this kind of cast, incorporating waypoint thinking has helped me very much. It can even help your straight casting (extended drift, layback, Graeme's adjustments).

Cheers,
Dirk
Maybe it's a personal obsession of mine, in the throw I always try to go to the essentials to get a throw, when to get the same thing I have to add movements or difficulties, this is not good for me (obviously it's my idea, which is not it must apply to everyone) this with regard to fishing, if instead we talk about fun to break boredom or to have sensitivity and control of my cast, I like it.

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Paul Arden
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Re: Waypoints

#16

Post by Paul Arden » Sat Oct 24, 2020 6:19 am

The Snaplift gives me fat more control over anchor positioning than any other method. I’ve been meaning to make a video for about 18 months so I feel it might happen soon :D
A1F76DCA-55A7-49F1-A54C-8F7DCBF8C5C0.jpeg
A1F76DCA-55A7-49F1-A54C-8F7DCBF8C5C0.jpeg (88.86 KiB) Viewed 56 times
In the video above I’m making aerielised Switch/Single Spey casts. It’s possible to do this by stalling the backcast, but it’s easier with the Snaplift.

Cheers, Paul
It's an exploration; bring a flyrod.

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Bianchetti Ivan
Posts: 170
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2015 8:25 am

Re: Waypoints

#17

Post by Bianchetti Ivan » Sat Oct 24, 2020 6:24 am

Paul Arden wrote:
Sat Oct 24, 2020 5:48 am
Hi Ivan,

Depends what you are comparing here. If we are to land the anchor on the water and then compare snaplift switch to switch without the snaplift, then the snaplift goes further. This is because of the way the anchor folds over and lands. We are talking several metres difference with trout tackle and long belly or DT lines.

I have no problems fishing these (and other similar) casts with dry flies. It’s only dangerous if you don’t control them properly (lack of practise!). I will do a teaching video of them at some point.

If we are comparing anchored to aerielised then I agree the anchored is more efficient. However the aerielised is less disturbing. I often aerielise all Spey casts, including Double and Single Spey and Snake Roll. Some distance is sacrificed but an aerielised Double Spey is far less disturbing and has no splash.

Cheers, Paul
Hi Paul
I am comparing a cast without anchor, letting go behind the line without letting and this, here is a half forward cast and one more back, I think they are more for fishing, while for the sensitivity and the fun I like .

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Paul Arden
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Re: Waypoints

#18

Post by Paul Arden » Sat Oct 24, 2020 7:32 am

Anchoring the line on the water is certainly more efficient, Ivan. However it’s not always necessary, particularly for short-mid range casts. When is first learned the term “Switch Cast” in the UK it didn’t mean “Dynamic Roll”. 25years ago it actually meant a Single Spey cast without an anchor (for many people). This may have had to do with the Fly Casting Handbook written by Peter MacKenzie-Philps, but he must have learned that from somewhere else because I’m sure he didn’t coin the term! In the Sexyloops fly casting manual I also used this meaning. It was only later that I started using the term Switch to mean Jump Roll, as it is used widely in Continental Europe.

There are actually times when you don’t want to place the anchor. Firstly it’s more disturbing, no matter how gentle you are. Secondly sometimes you simply can’t because there is stuff there - weeds for example! For short casts I’m quite happy not to place it.

Here in Malaysia with Snakehead shots, aerielised Speys is fundamental to change of direction shots. Here it’s not possible to place the anchor because the popper will stick! :D

Cheers, Paul
It's an exploration; bring a flyrod.

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