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Micro Skagit/Spey

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Ben_d
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Micro Skagit/Spey

#11

Post by Ben_d » Tue Dec 31, 2013 5:36 pm

Fair enough Ed, when you put it like that it all makes sense if DHD is your thing :)
Out of interest, what do you think the market for this kind of set up would be? I reckon I could probably sell one in maybe five seasons over here and that person would probably just cut something up and tie it onto a mono running line rather than splash out and buy something. Plenty of small spate rivers here that really suit similar tackle.


Cheers

Ben

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Paul Arden
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Micro Skagit/Spey

#12

Post by Paul Arden » Tue Dec 31, 2013 6:26 pm

I do a lot of tight streamer fishing Ed, I'll have to rig up something similar and fish it to know if I like the approach. My method of dealing with restricted space and a heavy fly, is not to beef up the line mass, but instead to lengthen up the leader and use the weight of the fly as an advantage. I'll give it a go next month in NZ.

Cheers, Paul
It's an exploration; bring a flyrod.

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Ben_d
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Micro Skagit/Spey

#13

Post by Ben_d » Tue Dec 31, 2013 11:51 pm

Paul Arden wrote:I do a lot of tight streamer fishing Ed, I'll have to rig up something similar and fish it to know if I like the approach. My method of dealing with restricted space and a heavy fly, is not to beef up the line mass, but instead to lengthen up the leader and use the weight of the fly as an advantage. I'll give it a go next month in NZ.

Cheers, Paul
Paul,

That interests me, I tend to try to go shorter on the leader and beef up the line if anything.

Cheers

Ben

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Paul Arden
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Micro Skagit/Spey

#14

Post by Paul Arden » Wed Jan 01, 2014 12:45 am

I rely on using the weight of the fly, and a very smooth connection from leader to flyline - you can just flick the fly around to about 10-12 metres no problems. On streams I'm usually much closer than that to the fish. I fish some flies that just won't roll cast, even with an 8 weight line. However they can be flicked into gaps, under trees etc, and the great thing is I'm using strong tippet so it's risk free. It amazes me how many big browns sit in tree roots during the day, and they'll all have a go.

The trick, if there is one, is to make sure that the fly lines up behind so that it's a straight line to the target. If it's not directly in line, it's going to go astray. I love this sort of fishing and it's amazing the accuracy that you can achieve. Sometimes it's even possible to throw the lure through the foliage and get a clean presentation.

Having said this, I have always been interested in the Skagit set-up because there is definitely a limited distance for what I'm doing before I have to overhead cast which Skagit would cover. It's interesting how we find different solutions to the same set of problems!

Cheers, Paul
It's an exploration; bring a flyrod.

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Snake Pliskin
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Micro Skagit/Spey

#15

Post by Snake Pliskin » Wed Jan 01, 2014 1:10 am

So basically French nymphing with streamers. You should name these things and market them Paul, you're missing a trick!
I'll give that a try actually. Maybe even for pike in your stream if I make it over before you disappear.
Steve.

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Micro Skagit/Spey

#16

Post by Ed Ward » Wed Jan 01, 2014 5:40 pm

Ben,
The market... that is one of the "scary unknowns" for us at this time. This line system was developed by us for our personal preferences of wanting to fish doublehanded through as many angling scenarios as possible. However, via inevitable public exposure through our own use of the line across many angling locations and circumstances, it seems a fair degree of interest and curiosity has been generated from the general angling public, particularly by steelheaders using Switchrods and trouters swinging streamers. This is a situation very reminiscent of when Skagit casting first started to "go public", where the actual innovators of the style missed out on some possibilities of reaping monetary benefits from their efforts due to not having much "commercial vision" or forethought.

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grunde
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Micro Skagit/Spey

#17

Post by grunde » Wed Jan 01, 2014 7:55 pm

I for one is quite interested in this setup, especially the line. And I would love to play with that sort of line/tip/fly setup using my single hander rods...

Cheers,
Grunde
"Essentially, all models are wrong, but some are useful."
George E. P. Box

Always question the assumptions!

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...

andrewparkeruk
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Micro Skagit/Spey

#18

Post by andrewparkeruk » Wed Jan 01, 2014 8:29 pm

Happy New Year Ed!

From 22 seconds this video is filmed on dead flat water. The line is being ripped from the water to form the D-loop. If you had said this is a casting vid then fair enough; but a fishing vid :???:

Andrew

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Micro Skagit/Spey

#19

Post by Ed Ward » Wed Jan 01, 2014 9:55 pm

ennio,
I'm not quite sure of your "question". This vid was produced to demonstrate the "Micro Skagit" line. It was shot under actual fishing conditions... notice the different flies being used, as evidenced by the different types of entries of the fly into the water during the Set of the line, from soft, barely perceivable splash - unweighted, smaller fly - to very evident splash - heavily weighted, large fly. I think that of the 7 casts shown, 4 different fly types were being used. The quarry was sea run Cutthroat trout, which prefer to lie in "soft" water, around structure. That soft water can be pockets amongst current or the calm waters of a very still pool, as long as there is structure around. At the beginning of the vid I am casting a surface skater to skate/twitch/pop it through soft eddy's formed behind boulders in the current of the riffle at the head of the pool. The rest of the vid I am casting sunk flies in the calm, main body of the pool, to the opposite, deepest bank which is studded with large boulders and sunken logs. The procedure there is to cast to that structure, then activate the fly with a strip. The strip retrieve is conducted for a distance of about only 20-25' because that is the distance from the bank where the structure ends and the river bottom then becomes gravel. The Cutts will not follow/take the fly outside of the structure, in other words, no point in "fishing" any further, so after strip retrieving the fly for 20-25', the line is then quickly brought in to casting length and another cast made.
If your concern is about the "rip" of line during the Sweep... these fish don't seem bothered with surface disturbances that occur at a distance of 30' or more from their location. They are however, concerned with visual anomalies... notice that I am wearing camo clothing. Searun Cutts of the Pacific North West are known for their spookiness in conditions of low, clear water. Most Searun anglers use small flies, small rods and light lines - 7 1/2' to 8 1/2' 3 and 4 weights - and approaches of stealth to target these fish. I, on the other hand, like to use larger flies and the advantage of distance. Both approaches work.

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Lasse Karlsson
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Micro Skagit/Spey

#20

Post by Lasse Karlsson » Thu Jan 02, 2014 10:44 am

grunde wrote:I for one is quite interested in this setup, especially the line. And I would love to play with that sort of line/tip/fly setup using my single hander rods...

Cheers,
Grunde
Hi Grunde

Rio has skagitheads for singlehanders, if you're using heavier singlehanders more normal skagitheads works fine.
Otherwise it's quite easy to make short heavy heads for light rods ;)

Cheers
Lasse
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