PLEASE NOTE: In order to post on the Board you need to have registered. To register please email paul@sexyloops.com including your real name and username. Registration takes less than 24hrs, unless Paul is fishing deep in the jungle!

Fly Line for beginners?

Post Reply
Bendix
Posts: 54
Joined: Fri Jan 15, 2021 12:23 pm
Location: Denmark

Fly Line for beginners?

#1

Post by Bendix » Fri Jun 11, 2021 9:30 am

Hello All

I don’t know if this subject has been discussed before, so please let me know if it has…

But the thing is, that I work in a tackle shop, that sometimes has complete beginners in fly casting and fly fishing coming in, who want to purchase a new fly line to use to learn fly casting (they usually already have a rod). And then the issue for me is, what type of fly line do I recommend?

The last customer I had, I recommended that he purchase a 7wt SA MPX for his 7wt rod, as I think that the longer belly on this line would be easier to learn with, rather than a short belly line (like the SBT from SA).

But what line would you, as many of you are certified casting casting instructors, recommend for a complete beginner? Would it be a short belly line, or a long belly line?

I would really like to know, so I can become better at my job, and also perhaps help beginners get a good start at fly casting and fly fishing.

Cheers

Bendix

User avatar
Paul Arden
Site Admin
Posts: 14815
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2013 11:20 am
Answers: 1
Location: Belum Rainforest
Contact:

Re: Fly Line for beginners?

#2

Post by Paul Arden » Fri Jun 11, 2021 12:14 pm

Hi Bendix,

This is a really good question. But I wouldn’t call the MPX a long belly. The head is 35’. (The line is 1/2 weight heavy).

So for me the answer has to do with the type of fishing they are doing. I’m not a fan of massively overweight lines for beginners (or anyone in fact) because I think they inhibit learning good casting skills. Some of these lines are terrible.

I think that the MPX is actually a good recommendation. It’s a lot easier to learn the double haul and acquire some reasonable fishing distance with a relatively short head (for me 30-40’ is short, possibly bordering on medium. Long would be 60’ plus).

I am a huge fan of the DT. I personally think if someone wants to learn flycasting then this is a great tool. But if they need distance it is a lot easier to learn with a WF line.

So for beginners in general I would recommend true to weight (or close) WF, with a head length around 40’. If they are fishing rivers then a DT is adequate. If they are fishing the salt where you are, then probably a SH/ST.

Let’s say that they have a Shooting Taper and want to learn good flycasting technique that is not just casting a head… then I would recommend they start with a 40’ WF line. Progress to a DT. And then lastly learn with a long belly WF.

Cheers, Paul
It's an exploration; bring a flyrod.

Flycasting Definitions

Bendix
Posts: 54
Joined: Fri Jan 15, 2021 12:23 pm
Location: Denmark

Re: Fly Line for beginners?

#3

Post by Bendix » Fri Jun 11, 2021 6:23 pm

Hi Paul

Thanks for your feedback! It is really interesting!

I am of course aware of the fact that it depends on the type of fishing the customer wants to do.

But in the case with the customer and his 7wt rod that I mentioned, he told me that he wanted a line, that he could use for dry fly and nymph fishing in small rivers, Trout in Put & Take lakes, Seatrout on the coast, Salmon in the local rivers, and finally Pike fishing!!! And I honestly don’t know what line can do all of that…

So I sold him the 7wt MPX, and told him to first take it out on a lawn, and try to learn some basic overhead casting, and after that he could use the line for Trout in both Put & Take lakes, and on the coast. And then I told him, that once he felt comfortable with this, he could come back, and then I could sell him a line for Pike fishing, and a sinking shooting head for Salmon (in the local rivers here, you need a fast sinking shooting head in order to connect with the Salmon and Seatrouts). And finally I told him, that if he was serious about dries and nymphs, then he would be better off by getting an extra rod, that’s rated for a 4 or 5wt line.

In my opinion, this was the correct advice to give to the customer… But it would perhaps be interesting to hear the opinion of a certified instructor.

Please keep the answers coming! I would really like to learn to give my customers the best advice!

/Bendix

User avatar
Lasse Karlsson
Posts: 4423
Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2013 9:40 pm
Location: There, and back again
Contact:

Re: Fly Line for beginners?

#4

Post by Lasse Karlsson » Fri Jun 11, 2021 7:11 pm

What are those rivers that you need a sinking shootinghead to connect with the salmon?

Contrary to Paul, I don't mind recommending a short heaeed line, thats overweight, but it of course depends on the fishing they are going to do. A DT line true to weight is about the poorest choice to fish coastal seatrout on places like Stevns and Møn under the cliffs, conversly, a overweight short belly line isn't the best to present a size 18 blue dun on a long leader in Grindsted au for grayling. Then again, some people prefer that. Luckily theres no flyfishing police around. Best thing anyone can do, is to take some lessons, and learn. The more you know, the more the fun 😎

Cheers
Lasse
Your friendly neighbourhood flyslinger


It makes no difference at all whether you are in a fishing environment or on a casting court. Technique transcends all casting environments, irrespective of what, and where, those environments exist.

John Waters

Bendix
Posts: 54
Joined: Fri Jan 15, 2021 12:23 pm
Location: Denmark

Re: Fly Line for beginners?

#5

Post by Bendix » Fri Jun 11, 2021 9:02 pm

Hi Lasse

The Salmon rivers in my local area, where you need a sinking shooting head, include the Varde river, Sneum river, Kongeaa, and the Ribe river. I know that it can be possible to catch them on floating lines (I have done so myself in Varde river once), but the general consensus is to use sinking shooting heads, which is also done by probably 99% of the fly fishermen over here.
As an alternative, you can go for a floating Skagit head, with an appropriate sink tip, which is also done by some local guys (including myself sometimes).

But about the subject, I guess you are saying that the line I should recommend, depends on what kind of fishing the customer wants to do, which is also what I try to do. That makes sense, thanks!

And yes, I have the possibility to recommend at least 2 CCI’s through the shop, but the problem with this, is usually that people don’t want to pay for that… Even though it would help them a lot.

Thanks again for your advice, Lasse.

/Bendix

User avatar
Graeme H
Posts: 2030
Joined: Fri Jan 25, 2013 2:54 pm
Location: Perth, Western Australia

Re: Fly Line for beginners?

#6

Post by Graeme H » Sat Jun 12, 2021 4:00 am

I'd recommend selling them two lines:
  • A WF line for fishing with (for now), and
  • A DT practice line
Tell them to practice with the DT to become the best caster they can be and fish with the other line until they can confidently fish with any line they like (after all that practice.)

They get better service from you and you get another sale.

Cheers,
Graeme
FFi CCI

Post Reply

Return to “Beginners”