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Learning to read rivers

Moderator: Paul Arden

Boisker
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Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2016 7:30 pm
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Re: Learning to read rivers

#11

Post by Boisker »

That’s funny… I didn’t mean to blow you a kiss vince… must have caught it and not noticed😂
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VGB
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Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2013 12:04 pm
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Re: Learning to read rivers

#12

Post by VGB »

It made my day, you didn’t even give me a peck on the cheek after I took you fishing :D
Casting instruction - making simple things complicated since 1765

https://www.sexyloops.com/index.php/ps/ ... f-coaching
Boisker
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Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2016 7:30 pm
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Re: Learning to read rivers

#13

Post by Boisker »

😂😂😂
Viking Lars
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Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2013 10:45 am
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Re: Learning to read rivers

#14

Post by Viking Lars »

Trout are lazy f--kers, so think of a trout as your self on a couch. Where do you want to be? On a hot summer's day somewhere in the shade in a little breeze. Preferably close to the refrigerator with the cold beer and ice cream.
On a cold day, somewhere with no wind, even closer to the fridge as the cold makes you lazy and the desire to curl up in the couch overwhelms you.
Where the fridge is depends on the water and Paul has touched on where the trout find their food.
For sea trout and salmon in the rivers, it's even easier to figure out where they are, because the fridge never needs to open. They are also lazy f--kers, so they hold where they spend as little energy as possible, where they have shelter and where the water has enough oxygen. In the winter, that means slow water with as little current as possible. In warmer water, the need for oxygen takes precedence, so they move closer to runs, riffles and pools below white water. In very low water, they'll even find cover *under* the white water.
Common for them all is that they prefer as steady and predictable a current as possible. You'll very rarely find them in swirls, because it's not nice to have your couch on a carrousel.
It's a bit more complicated than this, but it's a good way of thinking about it.

Lars
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Mika
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Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2018 4:21 pm
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Re: Learning to read rivers

#15

Post by Mika »

Hello from snowy and icy Finland. Reading water, what a beautiful subject. This is first thing I teach when guiding. With some people more and some people less. The ones who really wants to catch a fish with them we spent a lot of time studying this.

I studied this by watching insects, leafs, small sticks... I even throw some floating natural stuff to see how current takes them. as Child we made ditches and watched how water runs, I still do that on spring time. When you have some mud in small water you can easily see how current goes. I have even wrote FP about that. :D

My approach is that fish are lazy. So they find easiest place to be in current and then take food when it comes. Exactly like us, if you sit on couch and someone brings you a beer, you take it. If you have to pick up by yourself from fridge, you really think if you want one.

One of the trickiest sentence is "fish behind the rock". Yes fish are there but how to fish is different story. Different species are in different location behind and fly has to come different way. This seems to be most common problem for beginners that they truly fish behind of the rock and at the same time behind fish. :p

Mika from sunny -8 celsius Finland :laugh:
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