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Survival

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Paul Arden
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Survival

#1

Post by Paul Arden » Mon Feb 10, 2020 8:49 am

Great FP from Andy on why we fish series https://www.sexyloops.com/index.php/ps/survival

Many years ago when I was a teenager I read some books by Desmond Morris who studied man in the same way we study other apes, which was massively revealing. Sport for example being a substitute for the hunt.

I’m quite sure that the 200,000 years that man spent hunting and camping is much more influential on our natural behaviour than the last few hundred years since the industrial revolution or last 2000 since we’ve become “civilised”. It should be no surprise that some of us feel closer to nature and ourselves when we fish and have campfires!

I feel that I’ve spent my whole life trying to avoid cities :D

Anyway a great page and fantastic writing from Andy.

Thanks,
Paul
It's an exploration; bring a flyrod.

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Re: Survival

#2

Post by Boisker » Mon Feb 10, 2020 6:49 pm

I’m sure that is why so many people enjoy fishing...
people have become so removed from the natural environment, particularly in the U.K. where there is no true wilderness. I’ve given guided walks on nature reserves and up on Dartmoor when it’s the first experience people have walking off path. Taking someone across a floating boggy area where the ‘ground’ bounces 6’ away from them as they walk really freaks them out :D
It’s one of the things that appeals about hiking /fishing in Yellowstone at some point in the future... it will take me out of my comfort zone, the most dangerous animal you’ll encounter in the UK is a cow protecting her calf :whistle:

There’s also something about taking your self away from people and the rush of modern life... a day up on the Dartmoor rivers, where I won’t see anyone, no roads nearby, is about as much solitude you can get in SW England... fishing up a long run can become sort of meditative, not thinking, just immersed and totally relaxed in the moment.
I can replicate that for short periods just casting in the field... I had a 6 month period as a student of meditating (didn’t everyone :D )... but I never really got into it... casting and fishing has a very similar feel at times, completely relaxed, nearly out of body type experience... if I’m not fishing 30 mins casting after work in the summer is the best way I know to re-set the body and leave all the stress of the day behind...

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Paul Arden
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Re: Survival

#3

Post by Paul Arden » Tue Feb 11, 2020 3:51 pm

I find it strange how separated people are from our ancestral roots. Campfires, star gazing, and obviously hunting and fishing. But I see lots of substitutes. I’m sure for example the TV is a form of campfire.

I never have had a direct encounter with a bear. I’ve seen them of course but I’ve never felt threatened. I’ve always had pepper spray handy in Yellowstone :) Quite a lot of fishing guides I know have “bear stories” :D

When I first moved to the jungle, I was a bit nervous about leaving the boat and heading in. But I’ve since lost that fear. Maybe if I had been chased by elephants or tigers it would have been different! Fact is animals are scared of us and with good reason.

The only survival rule I have, is that if it looks dangerous then don’t fuck with it! And I’m still alive :D

Cheers, Paul
It's an exploration; bring a flyrod.

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