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Accuracy

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Carol
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Location: Summit County, Colorado

Accuracy

#1

Post by Carol » Sat Apr 04, 2020 3:18 pm

Below are the FFI CCI exam expectations for Task 12 and 13: Accuracy on and off shoulder. I'm practicing with rotation throughout the stroke, as suggested by Paul and evidenced by videos of Paul, Hayes and others accuracy casting. Question: How do you deal with this in the wind? Do you maintain rotation throughout the stroke or change to a \\\\\\\\\\/ stroke for a tighter loop?

Beginning with the fly in hand, present the fly to targets at 20, 30 and 45 feet (6.1, 9.1, 13.7m). The candidate shall begin this task with the line extended to 55 feet (16.7m) and then strip in the line until only 4 to 5 feet of fly line is beyond the rod tip. The line shall be adjusted during false casting between the targets. Once the desired amount of line is established, the line hand shall cease being used and casting should occur using the rod hand only. If the candidate misses the first target at 20 feet (6.1m), the candidate will strip in the line until 4 to 5 feet (1.2-1.5m) of fly line is beyond the rod tip and begin again with the fly in hand. If the candidate misses the second (30’ 9.1m) or third (45’ 13.7m) target, the candidate will strip in the line to the previous target. A candidate is allowed three attempts per target. Allowances should be made for adverse conditions.

Expectations: The fly shall land within a 30 inch (76 cm) ring or within 15 inches (38 cm) of the center of a target; loop trajectory should be adjusted as target distance changes; there should be no ticking of the fly before the presentation; the back casts should be approximately 180 degrees from the target. Loop control should be exhibited throughout the task in both forward and back casts.


Thanks all !

P.S. Thank gawd for casting practice, exam prep, fly tying and podcasts. #COVIDcrazy.
Carol
Because it's painful getting flies out of spruce trees.

Morsie
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Re: Accuracy

#2

Post by Morsie » Mon Apr 06, 2020 9:54 am

Each target requires a different solution Carol. Part of what of what we are looking for is your ability to adjust trajectory, arc, stroke and pause between the changing distances to the targets. And in all of this no tails and consistent loop sizes front and back. Examiners will allow for the wind. Just make sure you have the wind in the right quarter for the task. Set the "tone" at the nearest target with a steep trajectory and a narrow arc. If that one is a wide arc you have nowhere to go, it should be the thinnest slice of pizza and have a trajectory like the side of Everest.

Morsie

John Waters
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Re: Accuracy

#3

Post by John Waters » Mon Apr 06, 2020 12:32 pm

Hi Carol,

Before you read any further with my post, please be aware that I have not undertaken the CCI. I do however, take an interest is all types of casting and IMHO, would suggest that for fly accuracy casting at the CCI/MCI test casting distances, you continue to use the rotational stroke and primarily, a vertical casting plane. As with all fly casting to targets at those distances, keep your elbow in front of your shoulder and extend your stroke by moving the elbow upwards and backwards on the backcast. On the long targets your elbow can be at, or marginally above your shoulder, the key is to only widen your casting arc at the back, not the front of the stroke. Moving the elbow in a horizontal direction at the side of your body, or widening your arc by adjusting the rod angle at the end of forward cast, reduces your ability to sight the fly and hence, judge your distance when the wind is primarily favourable.

You can still achieve the other objectives of the test, and give yourself the best chance of putting the fly in each target, by removing the variability that a side casting \\\\\\\\\/ type stroke entails.

As I said, take my comments with a grain of salt but for what they are worth, are some of my suggestions on fly accuracy technique.

John

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Carol
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Location: Summit County, Colorado

Re: Accuracy

#4

Post by Carol » Mon Apr 06, 2020 3:04 pm

Morsie wrote:
Mon Apr 06, 2020 9:54 am
Each target requires a different solution Carol. Part of what of what we are looking for is your ability to adjust trajectory, arc, stroke and pause between the changing distances to the targets. And in all of this no tails and consistent loop sizes front and back. Examiners will allow for the wind. Just make sure you have the wind in the right quarter for the task. Set the "tone" at the nearest target with a steep trajectory and a narrow arc. If that one is a wide arc you have nowhere to go, it should be the thinnest slice of pizza and have a trajectory like the side of Everest.

Morsie
If I understand what you're saying, it is exactly what my mentor (who you know) says too. But I'm still wondering about the type of stroke used. You can have a narrow arc -- that is appropriate for the amount of line out of the rod tip -- and rotate all the way through the stroke or, with the same arc, pull through the stroke and rotate at the last moment, especially on longer casts. I'm just wondering what is best for the accuracy test: Competitive casters rotate through the entire stroke, but maybe for the average person, it's best to keep a tight loop.

As for wind, I understand that during the exam we can ask to adjust the course to accommodate for the prevailing wind, which is helpful. I don't practice that way because I can't adjust my yard or the river. ;)

Thanks!
Carol
Because it's painful getting flies out of spruce trees.

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Lasse Karlsson
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Re: Accuracy

#5

Post by Lasse Karlsson » Mon Apr 06, 2020 6:45 pm

Paul in WC


Me in WC beating Paul 😜


Steve Rajeff beating everyone at WC


Choose whatever stroke works for you 😊

Cheers
Lasse
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Morsie
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Re: Accuracy

#6

Post by Morsie » Tue Apr 07, 2020 12:06 am

Do they deduct points for tails and out of shape loops in those comps Lasse?

Carol \/ \\/ \\\/ would be my suggestion but unfortunately I can't alter trajectory on a keyboard. But as Lasse says find what works for you, and allows you to maintain "shape".

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Lasse Karlsson
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Re: Accuracy

#7

Post by Lasse Karlsson » Tue Apr 07, 2020 4:38 am

They don't Morsie, but you also only get one shot at each target, and the clock is running 😉 and tails cost you precision, and so does out of shape loops, but you already knew that...
At least we are allowed to haul in comp, which we aren't in the test..

Cheers
Lasse
Your friendly neighbourhood flyslinger

http://www.karlssonflyfishing.com

***Bring Mark back!!!!!! ***

John Waters
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Re: Accuracy

#8

Post by John Waters » Tue Apr 07, 2020 8:04 am

Sums it up well Lasse, I can only add that the targets are at variable distances, not fixed distances, so distance judgement whilst false casting is paramount. Sure does test all aspects of casting technique and knowledge, as do all 15 competition events.

John

Morsie
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Re: Accuracy

#9

Post by Morsie » Tue Apr 07, 2020 9:28 am

Jeez look at Rajeff's stops. Bloody beautiful.

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Paul Arden
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Re: Accuracy

#10

Post by Paul Arden » Wed Apr 08, 2020 5:53 am

Steve is a machine. I watched him throw 78 out of possible 80 in Norway. Unreal casting. Super tight loops, rapid change in trajectory and shot straight into the middle of the target. Very inspiring for me. I now have rings off the back of my boat. To get good at this you have to make it your thing.

CCI and MCI are not competition level and you are not expected to know how to teach it or do it for that matter. It’s more about as Morsie says, the adjustments you make. Hitting the rings is less important than tracking, trajectory, variable casting arc.

But that’s boring, because hitting rings at variable distances with one shot per ring is exciting. And fun. Anything that John says in this is gold.

What I learned from Steve over the years. Rotate through the stroke to hover the fly. Imagine there is a brick wall beside you (Lasse I asked Steve a few years ago if he ever scratched rod butts down the side of walls for tracking - no this is a myth!!). Imagine you are casting through the loop down a tunnel. Imagine there is a little vortex coming out of the ring - actually maybe I made that one up, or I made that one up and then discovered Steve did something similar? Not sure.

What you do need is a repeatable stroke. If you are hovering the fly and it’s right on the money, then you alter trajectory and bingo. If your stroke changes between strokes then you have a problem. If your hover wasn’t on the money don’t try to make the adjustment and delivery in one go, get the hover right. I just hover once on the money and drop in. But maybe these guys at the top are repeating it to be sure to be sure to be sure.

I don’t know. But I do know that with practise comes performance. And confidence too. Accuracy is very good for sorting out tracking issues, stance, sighting, blocking and so on.

The most important thing I think of all, is not to look at the ring. But to stare at a point dead centre. There are variations, especially according to height over the water. But mostly I try to ignore the rings nowadays. Which leads to an important point - practise with rings so you can learn to ignore them. If you practise with tennis balls say, then you are going to be screwed when you have rings in front of you.

Cheers, Paul
It's an exploration; bring a flyrod.

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