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SW leaders

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Mangrove Cuckoo
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SW leaders

#11

Post by Mangrove Cuckoo » Wed Mar 27, 2019 11:14 pm

OK, I think there are a few things to clear up.

I think the term “tippet” may need some translation. It appears to me that in trout fishing the tippet usually refers to the section of leader with the smallest diameter, which is usually at the distal end of the leader?

When talking tarpon leaders that might be confusing as there are two leader parts containing the term tippet. To clarify, tarpon leaders have a class tippet and a bite tippet. The class tippet refers to the section of leader that is the weakest link. The bite tippet refers to the distal end where the diameter dramatically increases to lessen the chance of failure due to chaffing on the tarpon’s abrasive mouth.

As Pete has suggested, a tarpon following a fly is likely not to notice the thick bite tippet as it is further away from the fish and possibly hidden by the fly. I sort of agree, but I will mention that tarpon, if given the opportunity, seem to prefer to track the fly from behind and below. I think that is why they seem more likely to eat a fly when they are traveling in shallow but clear water… they are less likely to get below the fly and spy the leader. However, I am not of the school of thought that tarpon are not leader shy.

I know for a fact that if the leader crosses the path of, and is at an angle to, the direction the tarpon is swimming, the tarpon will definitely “shy” away from it much like a flying bird avoids a power line. There is no doubt in my mind that they see it. If that tarpon is at the front of a string, all of the followers will make similar avoidance maneuvers also.

Now, as to why relatively “light” class tippets (12 – 20#) are used?

As I have said before, one reason is that they are not necessary. A 16 or 20# class tippet has more strength than most anglers can muster or need… in shallow water. Tarpon do not dive for structure, and unlike fighting deep fish, where the fish is opposing the buoyancy of the boat, a shallow fish is only pulling against the boat’s friction against the water.

But there are other reasons too. First off, if the leader is essentially of unlimited strength (say 30# or up), where is the challenge or sportsmanship? Seriously… if the hook remains set, how can that fish get away unless it chews through the bite tippet because the fight has taken too long?

But the real reason is about responsible angling. In the upcoming Keys tarpon season, or anywhere large schools of migration fish are involved, there are going to be sharks. Sharks follow tarpon the same way Cero Mackerel follow schools of pilchards. If/when a shark involves itself with a tarpon fight, a responsible angler will break off the tarpon immediately. Even then, the tarpon is in grave danger, as the sharks are more than capable of dining on free-swimming tarpon.

The ability to quickly release the tarpon is essential and demonstrates respect for the rare and beautiful opponent that it is.

Please realize that my opinions are based solely on my experiences and the limited type of tarpon fishing I do here in South Florida. Things are likely different in other locations and everyone has the right to make their own choices.
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Paul Arden
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#12

Post by Paul Arden » Sat Mar 30, 2019 2:29 pm

Hi Gary,

I don’t agree with the challenge/sportsmanship. For example spin fishers for Snakehead will normally use 80-100lb braid. 20lb fly leader makes it impossible to hold a fish and keep it out of snags. And then you end up leaving flies and bits of line in fish. I use 40lb bite wire because one in ten bite through 30lb wire, and in order to make the weak link the fly knot and not the leader knot I use 40 or 50lb mono. So conversely in this instance using heavier line is more sporting because it results in less flies/wire/leader left in fish.

I do however fully understand and appreciate the shark dilemma. It’s tough work breaking 40lb leader. Many years back when I fished in Florida I remember suggesting using weaker hooks in order for them to straighten after the fish has been jumped a few times.

Anyway I wasn’t really thinking 40lb mono. I was thinking 100lb braid like for GTs.

Cheers, Paul
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petevicar
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#13

Post by petevicar » Sat Mar 30, 2019 6:48 pm

Hey Paul
Why do you want 100lb braid for GTs?
IANACI

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Paul Arden
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#14

Post by Paul Arden » Sun Mar 31, 2019 4:22 am

I was thinking about the ones on the reefs that are battled not the flats!
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sms
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#15

Post by sms » Fri Apr 05, 2019 4:30 pm

Yeah, 40lb might be too much. This 12kg (26 and something in lb) is quite painful where the butt (even thou a big one) leans against the body. The rod butt is slightly above horizontal, but at the top of the extended handle (which is inside my hand) is already at least as much inclined downwards.
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Paul Arden
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#16

Post by Paul Arden » Fri Apr 05, 2019 4:55 pm

I was breaking sinking SA lines in leader tests at 23lbs. and consequently decided I can’t fish them here. There is no pain in applying a straight 10KG pull, the pain is in trying to apply significant pull through the fingers while slipping line :)

However I am very impressed with the combination blank, and will have anothe made. It takes a lot more force to apply the same force but I don’t think the technique I use in the jungle travels well to Bluewater :D

Cheers, Paul
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sms
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#17

Post by sms » Fri Apr 05, 2019 6:04 pm

Yup, it really doesn’t as hand lining with 50lb gel spun is no go.
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Paul Arden
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#18

Post by Paul Arden » Sat Apr 06, 2019 12:42 pm

Ouch :D
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Lou Bruno
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#19

Post by Lou Bruno » Mon Apr 08, 2019 10:16 am

Paul Arden wrote:Hi Gary,

Many years back when I fished in Florida I remember suggesting using weaker hooks in order for them to straighten after the fish has been jumped a few times.


Cheers, Paul
Paul

A person with many years fishing for tarpon suggested I try this hook...I'm sure there are other hooks that will work.

https://www.ownerhooks.com/product/mosq ... ck-chrome/

This allows the fly caster to end the battle by simply clamping down on the rim drag.

Lou

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Paul Arden
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#20

Post by Paul Arden » Mon Apr 08, 2019 11:32 am

Thanks Lou. Do you know at what force they straighten?

Cheers, Paul
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