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Snap T 90 degrees

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Paul Arden
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Snap T 90 degrees

#1

Post by Paul Arden » Mon Aug 13, 2018 10:31 am

It's an exploration; bring a flyrod.

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jarmo
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Re: Snap T 90 degrees

#2

Post by jarmo » Fri Jul 17, 2020 9:56 am

Greetings.

I was doing some snap-ts today, with a 15' rod. When the amount of fly line outside the rod tip was around 62' (excluding leader), I started to have trouble with the location of the anchor: after the snap, the tip of the line ended too far "upstream." This was on stillwater, though.

So, in the snap stage, I was unable to cast the body "far enough downstream." At around 62', the tip of the line was a rod distance from me, at best, after the snap. I tried different angles in the snap, stronger lift with weaker snap, weaker lift with stronger snap, but a rod distance away from me was the best I got. I tried to initiate the lift as far downstream as possible.

Any ideas on how to get the anchor closer to me / make this work with longer lengths of line?

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Re: Snap T 90 degrees

#3

Post by Paul Arden » Sat Jul 18, 2020 6:20 pm

Hi Jarmo,

There is definitely going to be a length limitation. There is actually a solution to do two snaps but gauging length is always a problem this way. A far better solution is to aerielise the snap (snap over instead of under), sweep the rod around and then draw the line back into position with an on-shoulder snake roll. The line only anchors after the Snake.

I might need to make a video? It’s an elegant solution and causes far less disturbance on the water.

The Spiral/Snake can anchor just about any aerielised line configuration very precisely.

I’ve been meaning to make a video of this for ages. I’ll try this week. I’ve been promising videos for ages :p

Cheers, Paul
It's an exploration; bring a flyrod.

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jarmo
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Re: Snap T 90 degrees

#4

Post by jarmo » Sun Jul 19, 2020 7:01 am

Paul Arden wrote:
Sat Jul 18, 2020 6:20 pm
There is actually a solution to do two snaps but gauging length is always a problem this way. A far better solution is to aerielise the snap (snap over instead of under), sweep the rod around and then draw the line back into position with an on-shoulder snake roll. The line only anchors after the Snake.

I might need to make a video? It’s an elegant solution and causes far less disturbance on the water.
Because I think I can imagine what your are talking about, the answer is yes, you absolutely need to make a video of this!

While waiting for your cool cast to land on our screens, I was fortunately able to find a solution with snap-t this morning.

And what a gorgeous morning it was. A bit of mist over the sea, light breeze, plenty of birds around to keep me company, no people around yet to interrupt with the natural questions. (Catching any with that piece of yarn?)

But I digress. This is what I did, and some sort of logic for each step. Here I am calling the two stages of a snap "lift up" and "snap down." This is a snap-t (not snap-c).
  1. I initiated lift up further upstream. I can relate this to the double spey: if the tip of your line ends too far upstream, start the sweep closer to the caster / rod higher.
  2. I lifted up purely with a rotation, and very slowly. (Typically I use some translation.)
  3. I continued lifting up until the entire fly line was in the air. At that point rod rotation had created a good deal of angular change for the snap down. (Typically I may snap down while some line is still on the water.)
  4. I then snapped down briskly in the downstream direction.
With these changes, I was able to move the tip of the fly line to my feet, so some 15-20' in the desired direction. Because the head of this line is 66', problem solved for this one. Next I will load up my XLT and see where the limit is now.

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Re: Snap T 90 degrees

#5

Post by Paul Arden » Sun Jul 19, 2020 11:30 am

That’s nice! So the tip path on the snap down is longer? I’ll try to have a play tonight. In the middle of loading my boat but stuck in a rainstorm :D

I’ll definitely make the video this week. Since you are playing with this stuff, what I like to do is to practise aerielisIng all the Spey casts. Even the Double Spey can be aerielised, or aerielised up until anchor point if you want an anchor. Personally I’ve never understood why we would put a Snap T onto the water only to lift it off again. Circle C makes sense - heavy flies and so on. But the Snap T I think should be kept airborne.

The trick (without a video) is to snap over the lift instead of underneath. You have to snap slightly inside to avoid a rod tip/line collision. And then you have time to sweep line around into place (or spiral it around).

OK it’s stopped raining but it’s getting dark!

Cheers, Paul
It's an exploration; bring a flyrod.

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jarmo
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Re: Snap T 90 degrees

#6

Post by jarmo » Mon Jul 20, 2020 7:44 am

Paul Arden wrote:
Sun Jul 19, 2020 11:30 am
That’s nice! So the tip path on the snap down is longer?
Yes. Physicists, please excuse my French, but while I was solving the problem I was thinking about keeping upstream momentum small while maximizing downstream momentum.
Personally I’ve never understood why we would put a Snap T onto the water only to lift it off again.
I use snap-t as an alternative to single spey in rough wind: positioning the anchor is more powerful (read "accurate" in wind), and when the anchor gets there it stays there. Then again, I have not tried your cool cast yet.
The trick (without a video) is to snap over the lift instead of underneath. You have to snap slightly inside to avoid a rod tip/line collision. And then you have time to sweep line around into place (or spiral it around).
I promise to try to replicate the cast with a DH after I have seen it on video.

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Re: Snap T 90 degrees

#7

Post by Paul Arden » Wed Jul 22, 2020 9:21 am

I will try self-filming off the back of the boat later this week. :)
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