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Injury prevention

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Paul Arden
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Injury prevention

#1

Post by Paul Arden »

We have a topic on how to deal with fly casters who are injured. Maybe a topic on how to prevent injuries would be a good idea?

I see various parts to this:

1) technique
2) physical training
3) stretching
5) equipment

One thing that impresses me about my students who are in their 50s and 60s is that they tell me that they spend time in the gym.

Now I’m not sure why I should have this cross section but I do. I also think it’s a very good thing. Not necessarily for fly casting, but just for heath. We are not really talking about building muscle either, but instead maintaining strength. The older we get the more important this becomes. There has been lots of studies on the benefit of strength training in 80 year olds. (If you listen to those Peter Attia podcasts I mentioned earlier I think you will exercise too!!)

I would think that strength training has excellent benefits with regards to avoiding injuries. But these is certainly more to this topic. It would also be interesting to know if there are specific exercises that are beneficial for flycasting. Lee Cummings take on this is whatever muscles are tired after a weekend of flycasting are the ones to train. Can’t fault that logic :D

Cheers, Paul
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VGB
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Re: Injury prevention

#2

Post by VGB »

I don’t spend time in the gym but I am out walking every day, casting several days a week and hit the exercise bike at home when I can. I’m walking a bit of the South West coastal path next month and starting to plan a walk of the ridgeway next year which is 87 miles if I wild camp, over 100 if I go for a more comfortable bed.

In my 60s and my past injuries are starting to creek a bit, especially in the current cold spell, so am looking at stretching and have the Anatomy of Stretching by Brad Walker. It has specific injury and sport related stretches with throwing sports being one of the sets. It’s a good read but I’m nervous about breaking myself. However, my middle son is taking a Sports Therapy degree and will put a programme together for me. I plan to retire next year and will get a pool membership, I have rarely been since the kids grew up.

My casting technique has been built around enduring rotator cuff injuries, hence my interest in increasing stroke length by developing weight shifting and stability margins. Thanks to a brutal physio, M@#*!# the b’stard, my shoulder has more mobility than in the last 30 years but is still a bit tender. We also have a local physio who helped an ex serviceman to a gold at the Invictus games, I may sign up with her.

I also want to help the poor and promote world peace :)

Regards

Vince
Casting instruction - making simple things complicated since 1765

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Paul Arden
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Re: Injury prevention

#3

Post by Paul Arden »

I really struggle in the cold. I don’t know how people survive. In England people get to a certain age and hobble around. I never could understand why until I went back for Xmas :laugh:

I don’t go to the gym either. But I have a couple of dumbbells. Between those, press-ups, pull-ups, planks and running I think most things are covered. I get inspired to do my version of yoga from time to time. I’m convinced this is important as we get older and approach our prime.

Cheers, Paul
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Lasse Karlsson
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Re: Injury prevention

#4

Post by Lasse Karlsson »

I completly agree. Only ever gotten one casting injurie, apart from trying to take my legs of casting heavy sinker for fun, rest have all been work related or sport related.
The bicep tendonitis I had in 18 cost me 6 months before I got it removed with shockwave therapy. At rehab, my right arm was so weak that bicep curls was 2 kilo weights against left arm with 10 kilo ones. Took me almost 3 months getting strength back. And then added on to it, and never felt better and stronger, was doing full body workout, just to get fit. 19 was a good year physically, then 2020 and the shitshow started and I came out of the cycle of training. Last year has shown that with several minor injuries, that I am getting rid of, and training has started again. And I joined a team where my son does athletics, doing trackfit, so now I am also starting to run and shit. Just need to win the lottery so I can start competing in flycasting again :D
Might start winter bathing too...

Cheers
Lasse

Ps. I wote for Vince as miss universe!
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Bendix
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Re: Injury prevention

#5

Post by Bendix »

I also agree that you have to stay sort of fit in order to enjoy fly fishing. Let me give you an example of a guy who was in his mid forties, who I talked to a couple of years ago, who had problems with back pain when fly casting:

He had the issue, that he would get severe back pain after about 20 minutes of fly casting/fishing for Salmon with his switch rod. In fact, he would get so much pain, that he had to stop fishing for the day. He had then decided that the solution for him, was to purchase a switch rod with a very soft action, rather than the stiff fast action rods that most manufacturers make today. But the bad news is, it is pretty much impossible to find a soft action switch rod in these modern times…
However, it is not the fast action rod that gives him his back pain. It was however the fact, that he had a very, very large belly, and he is what I would call obese… So in other words, the solution for him to get rid of his back pain while fly casting and fishing, is to go on a diet, and hopefully lose a lot of weight… But who am I to tell him that?

That’s why I personally try to stay sort of fit and healthy, in order to keep enjoying fly fishing. I am fortunate that I have a job that gets me moving a lot, and I also try to get some long walks fitted into my everyday schedule. I never want to end up like this guy, and have to quit my passion, and that’s what keeps me motivated!

So stay fit, and enjoy life!

Cheers
Bendix
Rickard
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Re: Injury prevention

#6

Post by Rickard »

Paul Arden wrote: Fri Jan 19, 2024 7:12 am I see various parts to this:

1) technique
2) physical training
3) stretching
5) equipment
Volume and intensity. The better the technique and physical fitness is the more volume and intensity can be handled.
That's also why people are getting busted for steroids in none obvious sports. The restorative effect. They can handle more training.
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Paul Arden
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Re: Injury prevention

#7

Post by Paul Arden »

It sounds like diet might also be the problem there, Bendix. For me it’s very important to stay nimble. My life would be very much harder otherwise.

It’s a lot easier to suggest to friends to take their fitness more seriously when a) you’re older than them and b) fitter than them. Then you can extol the virtues while leaping past them breathlessly. (They love that!)

Fly fishing is very obviously the meaning of life, but good health is the foundation.

Anyway that’s a bit of a diversion. I thought it would be more interesting to discuss what to do for the converted. How to stay fit to fly fish, not why!

Cheers, Paul
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John Waters
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Re: Injury prevention

#8

Post by John Waters »

Rickard wrote: Fri Jan 19, 2024 2:59 pm
Paul Arden wrote: Fri Jan 19, 2024 7:12 am I see various parts to this:

1) technique
2) physical training
3) stretching
5) equipment
Volume and intensity. The better the technique and physical fitness is the more volume and intensity can be handled.
That's also why people are getting busted for steroids in none obvious sports. The restorative effect. They can handle more training.
Hi Paul and Rickard,

Agree, strength and flexibility are major drivers to the performance achieved through technique. All sports that require body movement range and sequencing are the same. The technique used is the key.

John
Rickard
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Re: Injury prevention

#9

Post by Rickard »

I'm not sure if this falls into category prevention or management.
But I think massage can help for both. And you can do quite a lot of this by your self. For fly casting I think that different kind of balls is the most useful tool. I find tennis balls too soft. Lacrosse and bandy balls have a good size and firmness.

It is quite simple how to use the ball. Just put the ball on the floor or against a wall and use the ball to massage stiff and aching areas of the body. You will find spots that are stiff and painful to roll on. Spend some time on this areas to loosen them up. It should be a good kind of pain, not like touching a wound. It should not be a tingling sensation either, then you have found a nerve. It should feel like getting a rough massage. And don't over do it so you end up with an inflammation caused by to much massage.
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Paul Arden
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Re: Injury prevention

#10

Post by Paul Arden »

I tried a foot massage once. I don’t know why anyone would do that. It was either extremely ticklish or incredibly painful. I had to leave.

A sports massage is a great. I really should get them more often.

Cheers, Paul
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